Yes the dining and living areas are the heart of the home – it doesn’t mean the bedroom should wait, or be neglected.

The Five Benefits of a Good Night’s Sleep

We all know that a poor night’s sleep makes you grumpy, clumsy and exhausted. What we don’t appreciate is the benefits that a good night’s sleep can give you. If you know what deep, restorative sleep can do for you then you’ll make every effort to get one on a regular basis.

Good sleep can improve your concentration and attention

You’ll be aware you’ll feel tired, but you might not be aware that tiredness can affect your concentration, decision-making ability and reaction times. Your attention can wander without you being aware of this, which can make driving or operating machinery problematic. At the very least you’ll find it harder to make day-to-day choices and make strategies, which can affect your performance at work.

You’ll be able to learn and form memories much more effectively

Sleep is when most of your physical repair and regeneration is done. It’s also when your brain and mind sort out anything you’ve learned during the day. When you say “Things always look better in the morning,” this is because your brain has been busy processing information and getting a grip on events. Good sleep also helps you to retain and manipulate information so it’s vital for students.

Sleep helps you to stay slim

Regular sleep deprivation affects the hormones that control appetite and hunger. You may always feel hungry and this can often lead to you craving high fat and high sugar foods and drinks. A quick cola to pick you up, a sugary cake… It all adds up…

Sleep keeps your heart healthy

Lack of sleep can lead to high blood pressure, diabetes and even heart disease. If you’re waking up a lot, your sympathetic nervous system (fight or flight) can become overstimulated as you don’t get enough sleep or downtime for these responses to die down.

Poor sleep also affects your body’s ability to control its sugar levels, leading to excessive sugar in the blood and eventually diabetes.

Sleep helps your immune system healthy

You already know that sleep helps your body to rest and repair, which is why you tend to feel tired when you’re ill – it’s your body telling you what you need. Getting enough sleep means you can produce all the right proteins, compounds and enzymes to keep your immune system running smoothly in its constant fight against bugs.